Skip to main content

Growing root vegetables

Several years ago I tried to grow carrots in our heavy clay soil and was completely discouraged when I pulled them up to find arms and legs twisted everywhere and not much carrot worth eating.  This put me off for ages, but then I read about how you can feed root vegetables to dairy cows (here) to reduce their grain ration.  This really appealed to me, so I thought it was time to try to grow some root vegetables again.  Nita at Throwback at Trapper Creek (my favourite family cow blog) recommended to me that I try to grow enough for myself before committing to trying to grow enough for my cow.  Great advice of course!

This time I have better soil and have more experience as a gardener.  I read a few of my gardening books and decided to try carrots, swedes and turnips.  We eat lots of carrots, I would say we eat nearly one carrot a day, but they are so cheap at $1-2/kg, it hasn't been a big priority to grow our own.  I thought it would be a nice challenge to see if I could grow our daily carrot in my garden.


I'm quite pleased with this carrot!
 The turnips and swedes are not vegetables that I would normally buy as they are usually $6/kg (my general rule is to only buy veges priced under $3/kg as that means they are in season/local and not being stored or transported long distances).  I have bought them only when I wanted to make vegetable soup.  To be honest, I had no idea what they really taste like, I usually just chopped them up and put them in the soup.  I didn't actually know which was which (and I think our supermarket doesn't either, they are usually next to each other and labelled "turnips/swedes"!).  It has been really interesting to watch them grow in my garden and learn more about them first hand.  And to taste them fresh and crispy.  They both taste very similar, like a mild radish I think.

Anyway, back in Autumn, in late May, I planted a row of purple carrots, a row of orange carrots, a row of swedes and a row of turnips.  I planted them directly in the soil.  In summer I usually raise seedlings and transplant them later, but I had observed that bok choi seeds that I sprinkled out the Spring before had started sprouting through the mulch in Autumn.  I thought that is the bok choi was doing ok, then I would give the root crops a chance too.  I scraped back the mulch, dug a shallow furrow (exposing lots of worms!), sprinkled out the seeds (trying to space them a bit) and them put everything back.  To my great delight, the seeds started to sprout after about 10 days.


another example of some root veges

After a few weeks, when the seedlings had got larger, I tried to thin them.  That is a big job!  The purple carrots were the worst as the seed had been full of bugs, I didn't think it was going to sprout, so I just chucked it all in the furrow, it seemed to have a very good germination rate!  I found that I had to re-thin every few days.  When the carrots got big enough, I just kept the thinnings to eat as baby carrots.  With the swedes and turnips, I replanted into staggered rows so that I didn't have to waste any seedlings, but I can see now that some are still too close.  I'm not trying to just pull out the biggest ones and give the others more room to grow.

About 2 months after planting, I can now harvest a couple of small carrots for dinner each afternoon.  I haven't worked out how to pick the big ones yet, sometimes I think one will be big, and it will just have a large diameter at the top and turn out to be short and stumpy!  Occasionally I pull a big one though!  I have also been harvesting a swede and/or a turnip.  I just cut them up and cook them with the carrot, either steamed, roasted or stir fried has been a nice change to our normal veges.

cooking the veges
I planted some more seed recently, but I think the soil temperature is too low (or the seed's no good) as not many have sprouted so far.  If I was to succession plant, I probably need to get the second crop growing before the frost starts.

Now I have seen the space required to grow enough to feed us, I realise the space I would need to feed a cow as well.  Nita feeds her cow 5 pounds a day, so about 2.5kg, that amount I have in the ground is probably not much more than 10kg, so we wouldn't last long!  For now I have been feeding Bella the tops, which she seems to enjoy.


the root vegetable patch


turnips (a bit close together)

swedes
Next season I would like to try parsnip, salsify (which I only heard about from watching River Cottage, just need to source seeds now!) and mangle wurzle (again, have read about it to find out the best season).  And I will see if we can grow carrots over summer, it might get too hot, but its worth a try :)

And so of course my plans for Cheslyn Rise now include a HUGE root crop area for the cow!  What root vegetables do you grow for you and your animals?  

Comments

  1. What a great carrot picture, just perfect. Mine always grow a bit crooked but still taste good.
    I remember an older lady who was telling me what it was like arriving as a child from war torn Europe to a placement camp in Australia, to discover that Australians ate 'cow food' , that is, carrots and pumpkin!She recalls being horrified that we would eat something they would normally feed to their cows in the barn over winter.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Definitely grow the parsnip. I remember when you get them for under $2 a kilo here in Sydney in the early 2000's.. these days they are $7 on special and up to $9 regular pricing. They used to be my favourite root vegetable and remember every family roast being accompanied with a huge pile of them but I eat them so rarely now due to the price.

    Did they get trendy?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I've had the same issue with carrots. They look hideous, like some nuclear accident, but I've gone ahead and grated them into veggie patties and the like. And much to my surprise, they taste great. I have my theories as to what I'm doing wrong and so will try those changes next time. But the chooks seem to like the tops too, so its all OK

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have lots of trouble growing carrots. They don't germinate, they do but don't grow, slaters eat into them, We get some but not nearly enough to have every day so it is one thing that I sometimes buy. I keep putting them in and trying though so maybe one day. If the are misformed it doesn't worry me as they all look the same when chopped up.

    Barb.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Glad to see your success. : ) I'm thinking of getting a garden plot in the community garden for next year. It's a bit daunting, though!

    I just launched a new real food blog carnival called Fill Those Jars Friday. I'd love to have you come stop by and share this on it: http://toomanyjarsinmykitchen.com/2012/08/10/fill-those-jars-friday-august-10-2012/

    See you there!
    Mindy

    ReplyDelete
  6. hi everyone, glad I'm not the only one with carrot troubles, at least I can encourage you to keep trying! And its true that they still taste good even if they look funny :)

    I love Kim's story about the cow food! I've been feeding the tops to Bella, but the roots are too precious at the moment :)

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

Popular posts from this blog

What to do with eight acres

Behind the scenes of my blog I can see the search terms that led people to find my blog.  It can be quite interesting to look through them occasionally and see what people are looking for.  Most of them involve chicken tractors, but another question that comes up regularly is “what can you do with eight acres?” or “how much land is eight acres?”.  Today I will try to answer this question.

Of course it is a very broad question, there are lots and lots of things you can do with eight acres, but I’m going to assume that you want to live there, feed your family and maybe make a little extra money.  I make that assumption because that’s what I know about, if you want to do something else with your eight acres, you will need to look somewhere else.

If you haven’t chosen your land yet, here a few things to look for.  Focus on the things you can’t change and try to choose the best property you can find in your price range.  Look for clean water in dams, bores or wells, either on the property …

Growing and eating chokos (chayotes)

** Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about my garden, soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....

Cooking chokos (not be confused with another post about cooking chooks) has been the subject of a few questions on my blog lately, so here's some more information for you.
Chokos - also known as Chayote, christophene or christophine, cho-cho, mirliton or merleton, chuchu, Cidra, Guatila, Centinarja, Pipinola, pear squash, vegetable pear, chouchoute, güisquil, Labu Siam, Ishkus or Chowchow, Pataste, Tayota, Sayote - is a vine belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family, along with pumpkins, squash and melons, with the botanical name Sechium edule.


The choko contains a large seed, like a mango, but if you pick them small enough it is soft enough to eat.  If you leave the choko for long enough it will sprout from one end and start to grow a vine.  To grow the choko, just plant the sprouted choko a…

Making tallow soap

Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....
For some reason I've always thought that making soap seemed too hard.  For a start the number of ingredients required was confusing and all the safety warnings about using the alkali put me off.  The worst part for me was that most of the ingredients had to be purchased, and some even imported (palm oil and coconut oil), which never seemed very self-sufficient.  I can definitely see the benefits of using homemade soap instead of mass produced soap (that often contains synthetic fragrance, colour, preservatives, and has had the glycerine removed), but it seemed to me that if I was going to buy all the ingredients I may as well just buy the soap and save myself all the hassle.  For the past several years I have bought homemade soap from various market stalls and websites, and that has suited me just fine.